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MAR
21
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Trump changes his mind on Electoral College, now wants to keep it

Trump changes his mind on Electoral College, now wants to keep itIn a not-totally-unexpected reversal of policy, President Trump, who before being elected president called the Electoral College “a disaster for democracy,” now says it’s “far better for the U.S.A.”



Devin Nunes sued a Twitter account dedicated to a cow. Now it has more followers than he does

Devin Nunes sued a Twitter account dedicated to a cow. Now it has more followers than he doesRep. Devin Nunes filed a $250 million lawsuit against Twitter and a number of parody accounts. Now, one dedicated to a cow has, um, mooved past him.



Turkey's Erdogan calls on New Zealand to restore death penalty over shooting

Turkey's Erdogan calls on New Zealand to restore death penalty over shootingPresident Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday called on New Zealand to restore the death penalty for the gunman who killed 50 people at two Christchurch mosques, warning that Turkey would make the attacker pay for his act if New Zealand did not. Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, a suspected white supremacist, was charged with murder on Saturday after a lone gunman opened fire at the two mosques during Muslim Friday prayers. If New Zealand doesn't make you, we know how to make you pay one way or another," Erdogan told an election rally of thousands in northern Turkey.



Pilot who hitched a ride in cockpit saved doomed Lion Air Boeing 737 Max day before it crashed

Pilot who hitched a ride in cockpit saved doomed Lion Air Boeing 737 Max day before it crashedAs the Lion Air crew fought to control their diving Boeing 737 Max 8, they got help from an unexpected source: an off-duty pilot who happened to be riding in the cockpit. That extra pilot, who was seated in the cockpit jumpseat, correctly diagnosed the problem and told the crew how to disable a malfunctioning flight-control system and save the plane, two people familiar with Indonesia’s investigation told Bloomberg. The next day, under command of a different crew facing what investigators said was an identical malfunction, the jetliner crashed into the Java Sea killing all 189 aboard. The previously undisclosed detail on the earlier Lion Air flight represents a new clue in the mystery of how some 737 Max pilots faced with the malfunction have been able to avert disaster while the others lost control of their planes and crashed. The presence of a third pilot in the cockpit wasn’t contained in Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee’s November 28 report on the crash and hasn’t previously been reported. Airlines with Boeing 737 Max 8s in their fleet The so-called dead-head pilot on the earlier flight from Bali to Jakarta told the crew to cut power to the motor driving the nose down, according to the people familiar, part of a checklist that all pilots are required to memorise. “All the data and information that we have on the flight and the aircraft have been submitted to the Indonesian NTSC. We can’t provide additional comment at this stage due the ongoing investigation on the accident,” Lion Air spokesman Danang Prihantoro said. The Indonesia safety committee report said the plane had had multiple failures on previous flights and hadn’t been properly repaired. Representatives for Boeing and the Indonesian safety committee declined to comment on the earlier flight. The safety system, designed to keep planes from climbing too steeply and stalling, has come under scrutiny by investigators of the crash as well as a subsequent one less than five months later in Ethiopia. A malfunctioning sensor is believed to have tricked the Lion Air plane’s computers into thinking it needed to automatically bring the nose down to avoid a stall. Jakarta plane crash: Flight Lion Air JT610 Boeing’s 737 Max was grounded on March 13 by US regulatorsafter similarities to the Oct. 29 Lion Air crash emerged in the investigation of the March 10 crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. In the wake of the two accidents, questions have emerged about how Boeing’s design of the new 737 model were approved. The Transportation Department’s inspector general is conducting a review of how the plane was certified to fly and a grand jury under the US Justice Department is also seeking records in a possible criminal probe of the plane’s certification. The FAA last week said it planned to mandate changes in the system to make it less likely to activate when there is no emergency. The agency and Boeing said they are also going to require additional training and references to it in flight manuals. “We will fully cooperate in the review in the Department of Transportation’s audit,” Boeing spokesman Charles Bickers said. The company has declined to comment on the criminal probe. After the Lion Air crash, two US pilots’ unions said the potential risks of the system, known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, hadn’t been sufficiently spelled out in their manuals or training. None of the documentation for the Max aircraft included an explanation, the union leaders said. “We don’t like that we weren’t notified,’’ Jon Weaks, president of the Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, said in November. “It makes us question, ‘Is that everything, guys?’ I would hope there are no more surprises out there.’’ The Allied Pilots Association union at American Airlines Group Inc. also said details about the system weren’t included in the documentation about the plane. Following the Lion Air crash, the FAA required Boeing to notify airlines about the system and Boeing sent a bulletin to all customers flying the Max reminding them how to disable it in an emergency. Authorities have released few details about Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 other than it flew a “very similar” track as the Lion Air planes and then dove sharply into the ground. There have been no reports of maintenance issues with the Ethiopian Airlines plane before its crash. If the same issue is also found to have helped bring down Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, one of the most vexing questions crash investigators and aviation safety consultants are asking is why the pilots on that flight didn’t perform the checklist that disables the system. “After this horrific Lion Air accident, you’d think that everyone flying this airplane would know that’s how you turn this off,” said Steve Wallace, the former director of the US Federal Aviation Administration’s accident investigation branch. The combination of factors required to bring down a plane in these circumstances suggests other issues may also have occurred in the Ethiopia crash, said Jeffrey Guzzetti, who also directed accident investigations at FAA and is now a consultant. “It’s simply implausible that this MCAS deficiency by itself can down a modern jetliner with a trained crew,” Guzzetti said. MCAS is driven by a single sensor near the nose that measures the so-called angle of attack, or whether air is flowing parallel to the length of the fuselage or at an angle. On the Lion Air flights, the angle-of-attack sensor had failed and was sending erroneous readings indicating the plane’s nose was pointed dangerously upward. Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.



What Happens Next in Brexit? Two Cliff-Edges and a Summit

What Happens Next in Brexit? Two Cliff-Edges and a Summit(Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit, sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, and tell us your Brexit story. 



US State Department under fire for secrecy surrounding 'faith-based media' press conference

US State Department under fire for secrecy surrounding 'faith-based media' press conferenceThe US State Department has raised concerns among the American press after conducting a conference call exclusively with “faith based media” outlets. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo reportedly participated in the Monday afternoon press call. Reporters from networks across the country are typically provided the opportunity to listen to these State Department calls and ask questions about news developments and upcoming announcements.



Glyphosate under fire from San Francisco to Sri Lanka

Glyphosate under fire from San Francisco to Sri LankaGlyphosate, the world's most widely used herbicide and the active ingredient in Monsanto's weedkiller Roundup, is the subject of fierce controversy across the globe and is classified by the World Health Organization as "probably" being carcinogenic. A California court on Tuesday found that Roundup was a "substantial factor" in Edwin Hardeman, 70, getting non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after spraying the weedkiller on his garden for decades.



Floodwaters threaten millions in crop and livestock losses

Floodwaters threaten millions in crop and livestock lossesDES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Farmer Jeff Jorgenson looks out over 750 acres of cropland submerged beneath the swollen Missouri River, and he knows he probably won't plant this year.



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U.S. farmers face devastation following Midwest floods

U.S. farmers face devastation following Midwest floodsWINSLOW, Neb./CHICAGO (Reuters) - Midwestern farmers have been gambling they could ride out the U.S.-China trade war by storing their corn and soybeans anywhere they could - in bins, plastic tubes, in barns or even outside. Record floods have devastated a wide swath of the Farm Belt across Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and several other states. Early estimates of lost crops and livestock are approaching $1 billion in Nebraska alone.



Harvard sued by descendant of U.S. slave photographed in 19th century

Harvard sued by descendant of U.S. slave photographed in 19th centuryThe photos, depicting a black man named Renty and his daughter Delia, were taken as part of a study by Harvard Professor Louis Agassiz and are among the earliest known photos of American slaves. A representative for Harvard declined to comment and said the university had not yet been served with the complaint. Tamara Lanier of Norwich, Connecticut, who claims to be the great-great-great-granddaughter of Renty, accused Harvard of celebrating its former professor who studied "racist pseudoscience" and profiting from photos that were taken without Renty and his daughter's consent.



Missouri River towns face deluge as floods move downstream

Missouri River towns face deluge as floods move downstreamA string of small Missouri towns prepared for the next deluge along the raging Missouri River on Wednesday after flooding wreaked nearly $1.5 billion in damage in Nebraska, killing at least four people and leaving another man missing. High water unleashed by last week's late-winter storm and melting snow has already inundated a large swath of Missouri, Nebraska and Iowa along the Missouri River, North America's longest river. The Missouri River's next major flood crest was forecast to hit St. Joseph, Missouri, at 6 a.m. on Friday and Kansas City, Missouri, 55 miles (88 km) to the south, about 24 hours later, said Mike Glasch of the Omaha District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.



U.S. farmers face devastation following Midwest floods

U.S. farmers face devastation following Midwest floodsWINSLOW, Neb./CHICAGO (Reuters) - Midwestern farmers have been gambling they could ride out the U.S.-China trade war by storing their corn and soybeans anywhere they could - in bins, plastic tubes, in barns or even outside. Record floods have devastated a wide swath of the Farm Belt across Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and several other states. Early estimates of lost crops and livestock are approaching $1 billion in Nebraska alone.



Missouri towns prepare for deluge as floods move downstream

Missouri towns prepare for deluge as floods move downstreamA string of small Missouri towns on Wednesday prepared for the next deluge along the snow-melt-swollen Missouri River after flooding wreaked nearly $1.5 billion in damage in Nebraska, killing at least four people and leaving another man missing. High water unleashed by last week's late-winter storm and swiftly melting snow this week has already inundated a large swath of Missouri, Nebraska and Iowa along the Missouri River, North America's longest river. The Missouri River's next big flood crest was due to hit St. Joseph, Missouri, about 55 miles (89 km) north of Kansas City, Missouri, and Atchison, Kansas, a short distance downstream, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers spokesman James Lowe said on a briefing call.



Harvard sued by descendant of U.S. slave photographed in 19th century

Harvard sued by descendant of U.S. slave photographed in 19th centuryThe photos, depicting a black man named Renty and his daughter Delia, were taken as part of a study by Harvard Professor Louis Agassiz and are among the earliest known photos of American slaves. A representative for Harvard declined to comment and said the university had not yet been served with the complaint. Tamara Lanier of Norwich, Connecticut, who claims to be the great-great-great-granddaughter of Renty, accused Harvard of celebrating its former professor who studied "racist pseudoscience" and profiting from photos that were taken without Renty and his daughter's consent.



Mitsui petrochemical unit probed after Texas fire rages for days

Mitsui petrochemical unit probed after Texas fire rages for daysState and local investigators have begun probing a petrochemical storage company outside Houston where a massive fire fed by giant tanks of fuel burned for days, darkening the skies with soot for dozens of miles, officials said. The blaze at Mitsui unit Intercontinental Terminals Co (ITC) in Deer Park, Texas, began on Sunday and was not extinguished until early Wednesday. The agency has cited Intercontinental Terminals for violations of state air-emissions rules 39 times in the last 16 years.



Trump's border wall money may come at expense of schools for military kids

Trump's border wall money may come at expense of schools for military kidsThe U.S. Department of Defense is proposing to pay for President Donald Trump's much-debated border wall by shifting funds away from projects that include $1.2 billion for schools, childcare centers and other facilities for military children, according to a list it has provided to lawmakers. The Pentagon gave Congress a list on Monday that included $12.8 billion of construction projects for which it said funds could be redirected. The move comes as a surprise given the Trump administration's oft-touted support for the sacrifices made by military families and suggests the White House's desire to build a wall on the border with Mexico outstrips nearly all other issues.



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The President's offer seems at odds with past efforts to obstruct or discredit what he calls a witch hunt
Donald Trump, the President who refused to release his tax returns, just made an unexpected gesture towards transparency, saying he'd be happy for Americans to see Robert Mueller's final report.
Don Lemon: This is a trick Trump has played before
CNN's Don Lemon criticizes President Donald Trump for his recent remarks about the Mueller report, the late Sen. John McCain and George Conway, the husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway.
Hope Hicks to cooperate with Dems' Trump probe
Hope Hicks, the former White House communications director and long-time confidante of President Donald Trump, plans to turn over documents to the House Judiciary Committee as part of its investigation into potential obstruction o
Lawmaker says Hope Hicks has 'seen things'
Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA) tells CNN's Erin Burnett why he thinks House committees stand to learn a lot from former White House communications director Hope Hicks, who plans to comply with document requests.
Analysis: Mueller probe revelations explain Trump's rage
President Donald Trump looks -- and is acting -- rattled and encircled by the Russia investigation. And a series of fresh disclosures on Tuesday show there is every reason for him to feel threatened by the vast shadow it is castin
Opinion: If the Mueller report goes to the Supreme Court...
As special counsel Robert Mueller prepares to issue his final report, we soon could face a constitutional dilemma -- leading down the same road previously walked by President Richard Nixon. The facts are different in some respect
Justice Clarence Thomas asked a question for the first time in 3 years -- here's why
The question Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas asked on Wednesday -- one of his exceptionally rare queries -- involved race. But as has happened before, there was a twist.
Trump's acting defense secretary under probe over Boeing ties
An investigation has been launched to determine whether acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan violated ethics rules by promoting products made by my his former employer, Boeing, while serving in his current role at the Pentago
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Packed Detention Centers Force Migrants To The Streets Of South Texas
Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen will visit McAllen, Texas, Thursday as border officials begin a policy of releasing detainees into cities instead of sending them to ICE for processing.
Museum Curator In Florida Races Against Time To Preserve Holocaust Items
Since Holocaust survivors are getting older and their stories are fading away, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum is putting curators in regions where survivors live to preserve their memories.
Oklahoma Sheriff And Deputies Resign Over 'Dangerous' Jail
"The condition of the jail is such that it does not comply with constitutional standards," Nowata County Sheriff Terry Sue Barnett told reporters after tendering her resignation.
Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave
Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising — up 113 percent on average each year from 2013 to 2016. Dealers are adding cheap fentanyl to the illicit drug supply, and some users get it accidentally.
On The Brink Of Brexit, PM Theresa May Pushes For Extension With EU Support
The European Council President said a delay of three months is possible. But U.K. lawmakers would have to approve terms of separation that May has already unsuccessfully proposed to them.
Head Of Nebraska National Guard Describes Flooding Situation Throughout The State
Midwest flooding has stranded communities, washed out bridges and caused huge damage to structures and farms. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Maj. Gen. Daryl Bohac of the Nebraska National Guard.
Trump Administration Hopes New Leadership Can Calm Turbulence Roiling The FAA
President Trump is nominating Stephen Dickson, a former Delta Airlines exec, to lead the Federal Aviation Administration while it is being sharply criticized for its oversight of plane manufacturers.
Florida Moves Forward With Voting Legislation That Would Affect Convicted Felons
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with reporter Steve Bousquet about efforts in the Florida legislature to make it more difficult for people with felony convictions to vote.
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Trump Says Mueller Report Should Be Made Public: ‘Let People See It’
Mr. Trump has previously declined to commit to making the Mueller report public, but on Wednesday said the attorney general should “let it come out.”
Who Should Own Photos of Slaves? The Descendants, not Harvard, a Lawsuit Says
A woman is suing the university for photographs taken 169 years ago of slaves she says are her ancestors. The images were taken as part of a racist study.
Border Patrol Facilities in Texas Are Overflowing, Prompting Mass Releases in Border Cities
Hundreds of migrants are arriving every day in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley, where officials are scrambling to house and feed them.
An Iowa Town Fought and Failed to Save a Levee. Then Came the Flood.
Hamburg residents held back the Missouri River in 2011, then had to take down the makeshift levee that saved them. Much of the town is now under water.
For Clues to Howard Schultz’s Leadership, Look Beyond Starbucks
Mr. Schultz, a possible presidential contender, is best known for his wildly successful coffee company. But his time as an N.B.A. owner left a very different legacy.
As College Consulting Expands, Are High School Counselors Advocates or Adversaries?
With the expansion of private admissions coaching, some counselors feel sidelined, or fear their students won’t be treated fairly.
Cleveland Police Officer Contacted 2,300 Women Using Work Computer, Authorities Say
Sgt. Michael Rybarczyk was already facing charges that he solicited prostitutes when he was accused of sending messages to women on social media from a police computer.
California Today: What One Old Tower Says About PG&E’s Lax Safety Culture
Wednesday: How the utility chose profits over safety time and again; another reason immigration courts are bogged down; and seeing Oakland on screen
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*Disclaimer: Data may be delayed or may not be correct.
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Pence woos 2016 anti-Trumpers to bankroll billion-dollar reelection - POLITICO
Pence woos 2016 anti-Trumpers to bankroll billion-dollar reelection  POLITICO

When Vice President Mike Pence appeared before some of the GOP's most powerful donors at the iconic Pebble Beach golf course on Monday evening, he did ...


Massive 4-day fire at Texas petrochemicals facility finally extinguished - Fox News
Massive 4-day fire at Texas petrochemicals facility finally extinguished  Fox News

Emergency crews in Texas on Wednesday finally extinguished a massive fire ???????that had engulfed a petrochemicals facility for four days.



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Justice Thomas speaks as U.S. top court confronts racial bias in jury selection
U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared poised to side with a black Mississippi death row inmate put on trial six times for a 1996 quadruple murder who accused a prosecutor of repeatedly blocking black potential jurors, though the co
Missouri River towns face deluge as floods move downstream
A string of small Missouri towns prepared for the next deluge along the raging Missouri River on Wednesday after flooding wreaked nearly $1.5 billion in damage in Nebraska, killing at least four people and leaving another man miss
U.S. farmers face devastation following Midwest floods
Midwestern farmers have been gambling they could ride out the U.S.-China trade war by storing their corn and soybeans anywhere they could - in bins, plastic tubes, in barns or even outside.
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Trump: I didn't get a thank you for McCain funeral
"Not my kind of guy," the president says of the late Republican senator in his latest attack on him.
US mum 'abused kids who performed on family YouTube channel'
The woman, whose children performed on the Fantastic Adventures channel, denies charges of child abuse.
Forty-five rattlesnakes found under Texas house
A man called for help after spotting a few snakes. When the professionals arrived, they found a lot more.
Patrick Shanahan: Pentagon chief's ties to Boeing investigated
Patrick Shanahan is accused of frequently praising Boeing in meetings about government contracts.
Jussie Smollett: Empire's Lee Daniels describes 'pain and anger'
The creator of TV show Empire describes the "sadness and frustration" of the last few weeks.
President Trump shows map of 'IS defeat'
President Trump said it highlights how much territory the Islamic State group has lost since his election.
Oklahoma sheriff and staff quit over unsafe jail
Carbon monoxide, black mould and faulty wiring are some of the problems plaguing the rural jail.
Three children dropped to safety from apartment fire in Iowa
Dramatic bodycam video shows police officers catching them from a third floor apartment in the American state of Iowa.
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The Story Behind TIME’s Christchurch Cover
For the April 1, 2019, International cover of TIME, we reached out to Ruby Jones, a 25-year-old artist from Wellington, New Zealand, to capture the feeling from inside her country in the days following the terrorist attack on a mo
Looted by Nazis, Recovered, Sold Back to Hitler’s Photographer’s Daughter—How One Painting Got Back to Its Rightful Owners
"All of a sudden, paintings that had been part of the 'mythology' of the family are alive and there’s hope"
The New Zealand Attacks Show How White Supremacy Went From a Homegrown Issue to a Global Threat
With an attack on a peaceful nation at the bottom of the world, white supremacists widen their violence
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