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Confirmed coronavirus cases reach one million worldwide

Confirmed coronavirus cases reach one million worldwideThe first reported cases came from China in December, eventually spreading to nearly every other country on earth over the ensuing three months.



A national lockdown to stop coronavirus? Trump is 'thinking about doing that'

A national lockdown to stop coronavirus? Trump is 'thinking about doing that'President Trump shied away Wednesday from issuing domestic travel restrictions or a national lockdown to try and beat back the rapid spread of the coronavirus pandemic that, in a best case scenario, is expected to kill between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans.



The US intelligence community has reportedly concluded that China intentionally misrepresented its coronavirus numbers

The US intelligence community has reportedly concluded that China intentionally misrepresented its coronavirus numbersUS officials have accused China of spreading disinformation, and even some Chinese residents have expressed skepticism about the numbers.



Flattening the curve on coronavirus: What California and Washington can teach the world

Flattening the curve on coronavirus: What California and Washington can teach the worldNew data suggests the two West Coast states may have slowed the spread of coronavirus. How they did it.



U.S. sounds alarm on coronavirus in Japan, Tokyo pushes for state of emergency

U.S. sounds alarm on coronavirus in Japan, Tokyo pushes for state of emergencyThe U.S. government on Friday sounded alarm about the surge in coronavirus cases in Japan, adding to a chorus of prominent domestic voices - including the governor of Tokyo - who have called for decisive action to avoid an explosive outbreak. Amid growing clamour for tighter curbs on people's movements to stem a rising tide of infections, the government has so far been reluctant to pull the trigger, warning of the heavy damage that could ensue in the world's third-biggest economy, already close to recession. Instead, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has urged school closures and called on citizens to avoid unnecessary and non-urgent gatherings and outings while preparing to roll out an economic stimulus plan next week - even as he acknowledged the country was barely avoiding a major jump in infections.



After ignoring warnings, Israeli ultra-Orthodox hit by virus

After ignoring warnings, Israeli ultra-Orthodox hit by virusEarly this week, the streets of the central Israeli city of Bnei Brak were bustling with shoppers as ultra-Orthodox residents, obeying their religious leaders, ignored pleas to stay home in the face of the coronavirus threat. The military will soon be sending troops in to assist local authorities. The city has become a lightning rod for anger and frustration by some secular Israelis who allege insular Haredi communities — with disproportionately high numbers of confirmed cases — are undermining national efforts to contain the virus.



Some Coronavirus Patients Show Signs of Brain Ailments

Some Coronavirus Patients Show Signs of Brain AilmentsNeurologists around the world say that a small subset of patients with COVID-19 are developing serious impairments of the brain.Although fever, cough and difficulty breathing are the typical hallmarks of infection with the new coronavirus, some patients exhibit altered mental status, or encephalopathy, a catchall term for brain disease or dysfunction that can have many underlying causes, as well as other serious conditions. These neurological syndromes join other unusual symptoms, such as diminished sense of smell and taste as well as heart ailments.In early March, a 74-year-old man came to the emergency room in Boca Raton, Florida, with a cough and a fever, but an X-ray ruled out pneumonia and he was sent home. The next day, when his fever spiked, family members brought him back. He was short of breath, and could not tell doctors his name or explain what was wrong -- he had lost the ability to speak.The patient, who had chronic lung disease and Parkinson's, was flailing his arms and legs in jerky movements, and appeared to be having a seizure. Doctors suspected he had COVID-19, and were eventually proven right when he was finally tested.On Tuesday, doctors in Detroit reported another disturbing case involving a female airline worker in her late 50s with COVID-19. She was confused, and complained of a headache; she could tell the physicians her name but little else, and became less responsive over time. Brain scans showed abnormal swelling and inflammation in several regions, with smaller areas where some cells had died.Physicians diagnosed a dangerous condition called acute necrotizing encephalopathy, a rare complication of influenza and other viral infections."The pattern of involvement, and the way that it rapidly progressed over days, is consistent with viral inflammation of the brain," Dr. Elissa Fory, a neurologist with Henry Ford Health System, said through an email. "This may indicate the virus can invade the brain directly in rare circumstances." The patient is in critical condition.These domestic reports follow similar observations by doctors in Italy and other parts of the world, of COVID-19 patients having strokes, seizures, encephalitislike symptoms and blood clots, as well as tingling or numbness in the extremities, called acroparesthesia. In some cases, patients were delirious even before developing fever or respiratory illness, according to Dr. Alessandro Padovani, whose hospital at University of Brescia in Italy opened a separate NeuroCovid unit to care for patients with neurological conditions.The patients who come in with encephalopathy are confused and lethargic and may appear dazed, exhibiting strange behavior or staring off into space. They may be having seizures that require immediate medical care, and experts are warning health care providers who treat such patients to recognize that they may have COVID-19 and to take precautions to protect themselves from infection.Much is still unknown about the neurological symptoms, but efforts are underway to study the phenomena, said Dr. Sherry H-Y. Chou, a neurologist at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, who is leading a team of investigators for the Neurocritical Care Society."We absolutely need to have an information finding mission, otherwise we're flying blind," Chou said. "There's no ventilator for the brain. If the lungs are broken we can put the patient on a ventilator and hope for recovery. We don't have that luxury with the brain."Experts have emphaxxxxd that most COVID-19 patients appear to be normal neurologically."Most people are showing up awake and alert, and neurologically appear to be normal," said Dr. Robert Stevens, a neurologist at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore who is tracking neurological observations.Neurological specialists also say that it is too early to make definitive statements or identify the specific mechanisms by which the new coronavirus is affecting the neurological system.In one recent paper, Chinese scientists noted that there was some evidence that other coronaviruses were not confined to the respiratory tract and invaded the central nervous system, and the authors speculated that this may potentially play a role in acute respiratory failure in COVID-19.Stevens emphaxxxxd that all mechanistic explanations at this point are hypotheses because so little is known: "It could be as simple as low levels of oxygen in the bloodstream," resulting from respiratory failure, along with an increase in carbon dioxide, which "can have significant impact on the function of the brain, and lead to states of confusion and lethargy," he said."We are still in the early days of this, and we don't really know for sure."Neurologists in Wuhan, China, where the outbreak started, were among the first to report the symptoms in a preliminary paper published online in February.Since that report, specialists observed similar symptoms in Germany, France, Austria, Italy and Holland as well as the United States, including among patients under 60, Stevens said.Some doctors have reported cases of patients who were brought in for treatment because of their altered mental state, and who ultimately tested positive for COVID-19, although they had none of the classic symptoms like fever or cough.Four elderly patients who came into Danbury Hospital in Connecticut with encephalopathy ultimately tested positive for COVID-19, although they had no other symptoms, said Dr. Paul Nee, an infectious disease specialist at the hospital. Two of the four went on to develop low grade fevers and needed oxygen briefly, but two did not, he said.While it is not unusual for elderly people to experience confusion when they develop other infections, "the striking thing is we have not seen any real respiratory illness in these patients," Nee said. They have continued to test positive and cannot be discharged, even though they are not really ill, he said.But earlier reports had indicated that severely ill individuals with more typical symptoms were more likely to exhibit the rare neurological conditions, which ranged from dizziness and headaches to impaired consciousness, stroke and musculoskeletal injury. The Chinese study in February said that about 15% of those patients with severe illness experienced a change in mental status, compared with 2.4% of those who did not have severe illness, according to that study.Another study, published in the British Medical Journal in late March, found that of 113 patients from Wuhan who died of COVID-19, 22% had experienced disorders of consciousness, ranging from somnolence to deep coma, compared with only 1% of another group of patients who recovered from the illness.For potential COVID-19 patients and the people caring for them, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention includes "new confusion or inability to rouse" among the warning signs that should prompt a decision to seek immediate medical care.Patients who have encephalopathy and seem confused or incoherent are prone to having seizures, and should receive treatment as soon as possible, said Dr. Jennifer Frontera, a neurologist at NYU Langone Health who is working with Chou. She added that seizures can manifest in more subtle ways than the dramatic presentations often depicted in movies and television shows."Seizures are not always big things where people fall down and are shaking on the ground," Frontera said. "Some could be just veering off, not paying attention, making repetitive nonpurposeful movements, or just mental status changes where people are just not themselves."But even if seizures are not observed, people who are sick should be aware of other potential mental symptoms."You don't feel your best when you have a fever, but you should be able to interact normally," Frontera said. "You should be able to answer questions and converse in a normal fashion."She added: "I don't want everyone calling 911 because they're overly concerned. We just don't have the capacity. But if someone is really out of it, they probably need medical attention."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company



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Coronavirus live updates: New York City morgues are almost full amid mounting death toll

Coronavirus live updates: New York City morgues are almost full amid mounting death tollA pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed at least 6,069 people in the United States. With more than 245,000 diagnosed cases of COVID-19, the U.S. has by far the highest national tally in the world, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.



New York public defenders say unable to reach inmates in federal jails

New York public defenders say unable to reach inmates in federal jailsLawyers representing inmates in New York federal jails said on Friday they had been largely cut off from their clients since in-person visits were halted last month due to the coronavirus pandemic. "The majority of requests for a telephone consultation result in no response at all," the Federal Defenders of New York wrote in a letter filed in Brooklyn federal court. The group also said jail officials had not followed through on promises last month to set up regular videoconferences.



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Chris Cuomo: I've lost 13 pounds in 3 days from Covid-19
CNN's Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta speak to Chris Cuomo about his coronavirus symptoms and how he's been coping at home with the illness.
Weak jobs report: It doesn't count worst coronavirus effects
The American economy lost more jobs than it gained for the first time in a decade.
Dr. Fauci: Why the peak is coming, despite social distancing
Dr. Anthony Fauci explains why even after weeks of stay-at-home orders and social distancing, the peak of coronavirus in the US is still yet to come.
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Cuomo Says New York Has Seen "Highest Single Increase" In Deaths From Coronavirus
New York state had 562 coronavirus-related deaths in the last 24 hours. In a bit of "good news" Gov. Andrew Cuomo said 1,452 coronavirus patients have been discharged from hospitals in the last day.
Coronavirus Drives Away Volunteers Just As They're Needed Most
Many food banks and homeless shelters depend on volunteers. But fewer are showing up at a time when the need for these services is skyrocketing.
Some Undocumented Domestic Workers Slip Through Holes In Coronavirus Safety Net
The federal relief package won't benefit some taxpaying undocumented people, such as nannies who care for children, the home aides who care for the elderly and the mostly women who clean homes.
Slammed By Trump, 3M Says N95 Mask Exports From U.S. Should Continue
The president and others have criticized 3M, with some officials alleging profiteering during the COVID-19 pandemic. But the company says cutting exports would be a mistake.
Coronavirus Reset: How To Get Health Insurance Now
Many of the millions of Americans who lost their jobs in recent weeks also lost their health insurance. Others lacked a health plan even before COVID-19 hit. Here's a start to finding help.
N.J. State Police Authorized To Collect Masks, Ventilators From Private Firms
New Jersey has more than 22,000 cases of coronavirus, making it the second-hardest hit state after New York. NPR's Rachel Murphy talks to Gov. Phil Murphy about his state's response to the crisis.
Faster Coronavirus Testing May Help To Ease Results Backlog
One of the nation's biggest medical testing companies acknowledged a backlog of at least 115,000 coronavirus tests, illustrating how the nation is struggling to test effectively during the pandemic.
Guests To Michigan Wedding Looked Pretty Stiff
The well-wishers were cardboard cutouts. When the coronavirus stalled the couple's plans to invite friends and family members, a local packaging company donated more than a 100 cardboard stand-ins.
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New York braces for COVID-19 onslaught as state's dead nears 9/11 toll
New York state has recorded nearly 500 coronavirus-related deaths in a single day, bringing the statewide total to nearly 3,000, or about the same number killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Friday.
New York reports deadliest day from coronavirus, makes plea for help
New York suffered its deadliest single day from the novel coronavirus, with 562 additional deaths in the last 24 hours for a total of 2,935 fatalities, by far the most of any U.S. state, Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Friday.
Two young American doctors spend honeymoon fighting coronavirus
She'd picked her dress, they'd booked their honeymoon and the wedding was set for the end of March. Then, the coronavirus pandemic hit.
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Coronavirus: US set to recommend wearing of masks
The White House is expected to advise Americans to wear cloth masks, to help anti-virus efforts.
Coronavirus halts a decade of US jobs growth
American employers shed 701,000 jobs in March amid expectations there is worse to come.
Lean On Me singer Bill Withers dies at 81
The 1970s soul singer died of heart complications, his family said.
Coronavirus: US Navy removes Captain Brett Crozier who raised alarm
Capt Brett Crozier had pleaded for quarantine to prevent deaths aboard a US aircraft carrier.
How Trump's attitude toward coronavirus has shifted
Since the start of the year, how has President Trump's attitude towards coronavirus changed?
‘I just had a baby - now I’m going to the frontline’
A nurse in NYC ended her maternity leave early to help her colleagues on the frontline.
Coronavirus: 'Tiger King' star now in virus isolation, says husband
Joe 'Exotic' is among the 146,000 federal inmates the US prisons bureau is placing in quarantine.
Coronavirus: Tekashi 6ix9ine leaves prison early because of asthma fears
The rapper will serve the remaining four months of his sentence under home arrest.
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‘We Wanted to Cheer You Up a Little Bit.’ Jennifer Aniston Surprised a Nurse Who Tested Positive for COVID-19
"I don’t even know how to express my gratitude to everything that you guys are doing," Aniston told the nurse.
How Are States Across the U.S. Projected to ‘Flatten the Curve’?
TIME crunched the data to show how COVID-19 will play out in various states across the U.S. based on current projections.
3M Says White House’s Request to Stop Exporting Masks Would Actually Reduce U.S. Supplies
The company has ramped up production to 100 million masks a month, about 35 million of which are produced in the U.S
U.S. Stops Issuing Passports Except For ‘Life-Or-Death’ Emergencies
The U.S. State Department has stopped issuing passports due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with exceptions for people who have a “qualified life-or-death emergency.” In a statement published March 27, the State Department a
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