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Ocasio-Cortez throws her support to Bernie Sanders

Ocasio-Cortez throws her support to Bernie SandersAt a rally Saturday in Queens, N.Y., Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez made her endorsement of Sen. Bernie Sanders for president official.



Boris Johnson Furious as Parliament Refuses to Be Bounced Into Brexit Deal

Boris Johnson Furious as Parliament Refuses to Be Bounced Into Brexit DealREUTERSLONDON—Boris Johnson was left raging on Saturday as lawmakers forced the prime minister to seek yet another Brexit delay from the European Union. The extremely rare parliamentary vote taken on a Saturday did not reject Johnson’s compromise deal with the EU outright, it merely demanded more time for the deal to be examined and inserted an additional failsafe to stop Britain from slipping out of the EU without an agreed deal on Halloween.No. 10 was furious because Johnson has repeatedly promised to leave the EU by October 31, and that will now become more difficult. Brexit campaign insiders lamented the destruction of Johnson’s “head of steam,” and an end to the momentum created by his unlikely success in securing a deal from Europe. After another vote that went against Johnson last month, the prime minister is now legally mandated to write to the EU asking for an extension to January 31. The government formally asked for the extension Saturday night, but also sent a letter from Johnson arguing against the delay.EU Council President Donald Tusk said in a tweet that he had received the request. “I will now start consulting EU leaders on how to react,” he said.Johnson is expected to bring the withdrawal legislation to the floor of the House of Commons early next week, so he may only have to wait a few days to secure victory but Labour opponents—and nervous No. 10 insiders—believe that potential support for the deal may ebb away once lawmakers get the chance to fully examine the fineprint.Just two days after Johnson was back-slapping European counterparts and clasping hands with fellow leaders, his precarious grip on power was underlined once again in a vote that went against him by 322 to 306.In response, Johnson stood up and said he would refuse to “negotiate” a further extension with the EU. He stopped short of saying he would refuse to comply with the law and send the extension letter, although he reiterated his hopes that the EU would not immediately grant an extension. “I don't think they'll be attracted by delay,” he said.As lawmakers continued to debate the result, Johnson sat slumped on the frontbench shaking his head. It was a sharp contrast to his mood two days earlier. Tickled pink with the deal he had unexpectedly secured from the EU, Johnson had sought to rush back to Westminster and bounce parliament into agreeing. One of his own long-term colleagues, Sir Oliver Letwin, had other ideas. Letwin is a veteran Conservative right-winger who has been in the heart of Conservative thinking for decades. He was a member of Margaret Thatcher’s Downing Street policy unit in the 1980s and entrusted by David Cameron to write the Tory manifesto in 2010.He was kicked out of the party last month by Johnson after voting to ensure there wouldn’t be a No Deal Brexit. He exacted his revenge on Saturday by wrecking Johnson’s chance for a victorious homecoming. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



US troops in Syria heading to Iraq, not home as Trump claims

US troops in Syria heading to Iraq, not home as Trump claimsWhile President Donald Trump insists he's bringing home Americans from "endless wars" in the Mideast, his Pentagon chief says all U.S. troops leaving Syria will go to western Iraq and the American military will continue operations against the Islamic State group. The fight in Syria against IS, once spearheaded by American allied Syrian Kurds who have been cast aside by Trump, will be undertaken by U.S. forces, possibly from neighboring Iraq.



Petrol bombs thrown in Hong Kong as anger flares over 'triad' attack on protest leader

Petrol bombs thrown in Hong Kong as anger flares over 'triad' attack on protest leaderPolice and protesters exchanged tear gas and petrol bombs in Hong Kong on Sunday amid anger over an attack on a leading activist by men allegedly linked to triad gangsters.   Clashes broke out as tens of thousands took to the streets for an unsanctioned anti-government march, many also defying a face mask ban introduced in a bid to curb the protests.  Tensions ran high after Jimmy Sham, the leader the Civil Human Rights Front which called the march, was attacked earlier in the week by a group of men wielding metal poles and hammers. Witnesses said that those responsible for the assault were associated with pro-Beijing triads that have been blamed for previous violence against protesters.   On Saturday afternoon, a 19-year-old man was also hospitalised after being stabbed in the abdomen while handing out pro-democracy flyers in Tai Po, a district in northern Hong Kong.  Politically motivated attacks and vandalism have been on the rise as the situation continues to escalate in what is now the twentieth consecutive week of protests.  Protesters are now vandalising and destroying shops, banks, and businesses associated with mainland China. As moderate, peaceful marchers branched off from the more radical, black-clad frontline protesters near Tsim Sha Tsui police station, violence flared. Riot police fired tear gas and water cannon, drenching Hong Kong's biggest mosque with blue dye in what they said was an accident Credit: Kyle Lam/Bloomberg Protesters threw molotov cocktails and set fire to makeshift barricades, while riot police charged with batons and fired volleys of tear gas and rubber bullets.  Throughout the afternoon a water cannon truck chased protesters down Nathan Road, one of the city's busiest shopping thoroughfares, leaving it streaked with blue dye from the vehicle's turrets. The dye, used to identify protesters, also contains a painful pepper solution. The entrance to the city's biggest mosque was painted blue when the truck fired at a handful of people outside. Police said hitting the building was an accident. Vivek Mahbubani, a Hong Kong-born comedian, stood with a group of friends on Nathan Road, handing out water and egg tarts to marchers. “People passing by today shared our smiles and instead of feeling worried when passing. They all agreed that we are all Hongkongers," he told The Telegraph.  “When I heard about the attack on Jimmy Sham, I was horrified. To think that Hong Kong has become a place where something like this can happen was shocking.”



At a School for Suicide Bombers' Children, Dancing, Drawing and Deradicalization

At a School for Suicide Bombers' Children, Dancing, Drawing and DeradicalizationMEDAN, Indonesia -- Ais likes to dance. She knows the words to "I'm a Little Teapot." Her dimples are disarming.Her parents didn't want their daughter to dance. They didn't want her to sing. They wanted her to die with them for their cause.Last year, when she was 7, Ais squeezed onto a motorcycle with her mother and brother. They carried a packet that Ais refers to as coconut rice wrapped in banana leaves. Her father and other brother climbed onto a different bike with another parcel. They sped toward a police station in the Indonesian city of Surabaya, a place of mixed faith.The parcels were bombs, and they were set off at the gate to the police station. Catapulted off the motorcycle by the force of the explosion, Ais rose from the pavement like a ghost, her pale head-to-toe garment fluttering in the chaos. Every other member of her family died. No bystanders were killed. The Islamic State militant group, halfway across the world, claimed responsibility for the attack.Ais, who is being identified by her nickname (pronounced ah-iss) to protect her privacy, is now part of a deradicalization program for children run by the Indonesian Ministry of Social Affairs. In a leafy compound in the capital, Jakarta, she bops to Taylor Swift, reads the Quran and plays games of trust.Her schoolmates include children of other suicide bombers, and of people who were intent on joining the Islamic State in Syria.Efforts by Indonesia, home to the world's largest Muslim population, to purge its society of religiously inspired extremism are being watched keenly by the international counterterrorism community. While the vast majority of Indonesians embrace a moderate form of Islam, a series of suicide attacks have struck the nation, including, in 2016, the first in the region claimed by the Islamic State, also known as ISIS.Now, with hundreds of Islamic State families trying to escape detention camps in Syria amid Turkish incursions into Kurdish-held territory, the effort has taken on more urgency. The fear is that the Islamic State's violent ideology will not only renew itself in the Middle East, but may also metastaxxxx thousands of miles away in Indonesia.There are signs that it is already happening.Last week, a man whom the police linked to ISIS wounded the Indonesian security minister, Wiranto, in a stabbing. Since then, at least 36 suspected militants who were plotting bombings and other attacks have been arrested in a counterterrorism crackdown, the police said this week.Hundreds of Indonesians went to Syria to fight for ISIS. In May, the police arrested seven men who had returned from the country and who, the police say, were part of a plot to use Wi-Fi to detonate explosive devices.The risks, however, are not limited to those who have come back. Indonesians who never left the region are being influenced by the Islamic State from afar.In January, an Indonesian couple who had tried but failed to reach Syria blew themselves up at a Roman Catholic cathedral in the southern Philippines. More than 20 were killed in the attack, which was claimed by the Islamic State.In Indonesia, there are thousands of vulnerable children who have been indoctrinated by their extremist parents, according to Khairul Ghazali, who served nearly five years in prison for terrorism-related crimes. He said he came to renounce violence in jail and now runs an Islamic school in the city of Medan, on the island of Sumatra, that draws on his own experience as a former extremist to deradicalize militants' children."We teach them that Islam is a peaceful religion and that jihad is about building not destroying," Khairul said. "I am a model for the children because I understand where they come from. I know what it is like to suffer. Because I was deradicalized, I know it can be done."Despite the scale of the country's problem, only about 100 children have attended formal deradicalization programs in Indonesia, Khairul said. His madrassa, the only one in Indonesia to receive significant government support for deradicalization work, can teach just 25 militant-linked children at a time, and only through middle school.Government follow-up is minimal. "The children are not tracked and monitored when they leave," said Alto Labetubun, an Indonesian terrorism analyst.The risks of extremist ideology being passed from one generation to the next are well-documented, and a number of Indonesians linked to the Islamic State are the offspring of militants.The son of Imam Samudra, one of the masterminds of the 2002 bombing on the island of Bali that killed 202 people, was 12 when his father was executed in 2008. He joined the Islamic State and died in Syria at 19.Khairul, whose father and uncles were members of a militant organization, said he understood the pull of family obligation. He was sent to prison in 2011 for armed robbery and for planning an attack on a police station. Before his conviction, Khairul taught four of his 10 children to fire weapons."Deradicalizing my own children was very difficult," he said. "My wife and my children looked at me very strangely when I got out of prison because I had changed."Some of the children under Khairul's care were taught to assemble bombs by family members. The parents of about half the students were killed in armed conflict with the Indonesian counterterrorism police."It's natural for the children to want revenge for their parents' deaths," he said. "They were taught to hate the Indonesian state because it is against the caliphate."When Indonesia achieved independence in 1945, religious diversity was enshrined in the constitution. About 87% of Indonesia's 270 million people are Muslims, 10% are Christian, and there are adherents of many other faiths in the country.A tiny fraction of the Muslim majority has agitated violently for a caliphate that would arc across Muslim-dominated parts of Southeast Asia. The latest incarnation of such militant groups is Jamaah Ansharut Daulah, considered the Indonesian affiliate of the Islamic State.The parents of Ais, who is now 8, were members of a Jamaah Ansharut Daulah cell. Each week, they would pray with other families who had rejected Surabaya's spiritual diversity.The day before Ais and her family rode up to the police station in May 2018, another family -- mother, father, two sons and two daughters -- made their way to three churches in Surabaya and detonated their explosives. Fifteen bystanders were killed. The militant family was extinguished entirely, including the two girls, who went to school with Ais.Hours later, members of two other families in the prayer group also died, either from shootouts with the police or when explosives hidden in their apartment detonated. The six children who survived the carnage are now in the Jakarta program with Ais.When they first arrived from Surabaya, the children shrank from music and refrained from drawing images of living things because they believed it conflicted with Islam, social workers said. They were horrified by dancing and by a Christian social worker who didn't wear a head scarf.In Surabaya, the children had been forced to watch hours of militant videos every day. One of the boys, now 11, knew how to make a bomb."Jihad, martyrdom, war, suicide, those were their goals," said Sri Wahyuni, one of the social workers taking care of the Surabaya children.On a recent weekday, however, the children shimmied their way through team-building exercises. During Arabic class, they squirmed. They drew the human figure they had once considered taboo.But their religious practice remains important. Although it is not required, all seven still fast two days a week to demonstrate commitment to their faith."We don't want to challenge their religion by stopping them," said Ahmad Zainal Mutaqin, a social worker who also teaches religion classes. "Indonesians respect their elders, and we don't want them to think their parents were evil."Some day soon, these children of suicide bombers will have to leave the government program in which they have been enrolled for 15 months. It's not clear where they will go, although the ministry is searching for a suitable Islamic boarding school for them.The children of those who tried to reach Syria to fight get even less time at the deradicalization center -- only a month or two. Some then end up in the juvenile detention system, where they re-encounter extremist ideology, counterterrorism experts said."We spend all this time working with them, but if they go back to where they came from, radicalism can enter their hearts very quickly," said Sri Musfiah, a senior social worker. "It makes me worried."Irfan Idris, the director of deradicalization for Indonesia's National Agency for Combating Terrorism, acknowledged that threat, saying there "is not a guarantee" that the minors who have been funneled through government care pose no threat.Most children of the 1,000 or so people who have been convicted of terrorism-related crimes in Indonesia don't even have the chance to go through this effort at education and moderation. The government runs the one program in Jakarta and provides support for Khairul's madrassa."The solution is a very expensive, long-term mentoring program such as takes place with some of the white power youths in Europe, involving schools, social psychologists and attention to families," said Sidney Jones, the director of the Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict in Jakarta and an authority on Islamic militancy in Southeast Asia.But the political commitment to such an extensive effort is lacking in Indonesia.Alto, the terrorism analyst, said that even the nascent efforts underway in Indonesia might only be camouflaging the problem."Although it seems that they are obedient, it's a survival mechanism," he said of the students undergoing deradicalization. "If you were taken prisoner, you will do and follow what the captor told you to do so that you will get food, water, cigarettes, phone calls."But, he added, "you know that one day you will come out."At the madrassa in Medan, which preaches the dangers of radicalism within a conservative approach to Islam, a row of boys sat on the veranda of a mosque and expounded on their worldview. Dan, 12, agreed with classmates that Indonesia should be an Islamic state.What of the churches interspersed with the mosques in Medan? Dan, who is also being identified by a nickname to protect his privacy, giggled.His hands mimicked the shock of an explosion, and he formed a word."Bomb," he said. His laughter stopped.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company



Trump calls Mexico's president to express 'solidarity'

Trump calls Mexico's president to express 'solidarity'Mexico's president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, said on Saturday that President Trump called him to express his "solidarity" following an attempt to arrest a drug kingpin's son that prompted a wave of violence in the city of Culiacan.



Malaysia Fears Becoming Sanctions Target in Trade War Crossfire

Malaysia Fears Becoming Sanctions Target in Trade War Crossfire(Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Malaysia may become a target of sanctions as the export-reliant economy is caught in the crossfire of the U.S.-China trade war, according to Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad.Mahathir said trade tensions between the world’s two biggest economies could evolve into another Cold war, although he didn’t specify who could impose the curbs.“Economically we are linked to both markets, and physically we are also caught in between for geographical reasons,” Mahathir said in Kuala Lumpur. “There are even suggestions that we ourselves would be a target for sanctions.”He said Malaysia will prepare for the worst by cooperating with regional neighbors, but didn’t elaborate.Neighboring Vietnam has already drawn the U.S. government’s ire, with President Donald Trump describing the Southeast Asian nation as “almost the single worst abuser of everybody” when asked if he wanted to impose tariffs on the nation.Malaysia was placed on the U.S. Treasury watch list for currency manipulation in May for its bilateral trade and current-account surplus. The central bank has denied the nation manipulates its currency and said it supports free and fair trade.To contact the reporter on this story: Anisah Shukry in Kuala Lumpur at ashukry2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Yudith Ho at yho35@bloomberg.net, Liau Y-SingFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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EXPLAINER-What happens next after UK PM Johnson writes Brexit delay letter?

EXPLAINER-What happens next after UK PM Johnson writes Brexit delay letter?Prime Minister Boris Johnson will try again to get his Brexit deal passed by parliament on Monday after lawmakers decided to delay their agreement, a humiliating blow for a leader who has staked his reputation on leaving on Oct. 31. On Saturday, Johnson was forced to send a letter to the European Union seeking an extension to his "do or die" deadline of the end of October, but the British leader also sent another one to argue against what he called a "deeply corrosive" delay. Jacob Rees-Mogg, leader of the lower house of parliament, or House of Commons, said on Saturday the government planned to put Johnson's exit deal to a debate and vote on Monday.



NWS confirms a tornado touched down in Dallas

NWS confirms a tornado touched down in DallasThe National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down in Dallas on Sunday night, causing structural damage and knocking out electricity to thousands. Meteorologist Jason Godwin said radar confirmed the twister hit the ground near Love Field Airport and moved northeast through the city, at around 9 p.m. There were no reports of fatalities or serious injuries as of 12:20 a.m. Monday, according to a release from the city of Dallas, but Fire-Rescue spokesman Jason Evans says three people were hospitalized for evaluation of non-life-threatening injuries. Most of the damage within Dallas was limited to the northwest, with Evans defining the area as bordered by Royal Lane to the north and Northwest Highway to the south, as well as Harry Hines Boulevard to the west and Interstate 75 to the east.



UPDATE 1-EU revises up German 2018 budget surplus, next year's easing seen small

UPDATE 1-EU revises up German 2018 budget surplus, next year's easing seen smallThe data may not bode well for euro zone's economic growth prospects, as the bloc is facing risks of a protracted slowdown, which many economists say could be countered only with a significant increase in governments' spending - especially by Germany, the euro area's largest economy. Eurostat said Germany's revenues last year exceeded expenses by more than previously estimated, allowing Berlin to post a budget surplus of 1.9% of its output, above the 1.7% that Eurostat had calculated in April. The euro zone overall recorded a 0.5% deficit, unchanged from Eurostat's previous estimate as Germany was offset by higher-than-expected spending in other countries, such as Italy, which posted a 2.2% deficit, above the 2.1% estimated earlier.



4 suspects indicted in case of slain Slovak journalist

4 suspects indicted in case of slain Slovak journalistSlovakia's prosecutors have indicted four suspects for the slaying of an investigative reporter and his fiancee, a case that brought down the Slovak government. The prosecutors previously identified him as Marian K., omitting his full surname as is standard in Slovakia. Reporter Jan Kuciak and his fiancee Martina Kusnirova were shot to death in their home on Feb. 21, 2018.



Spain will exhume dictator Francisco Franco's remains on Thursday

Spain will exhume dictator Francisco Franco's remains on ThursdaySpain will on Thursday remove dictator Francisco Franco's remains from the state mausoleum in which he was buried in 1975, the government said on Monday. The ruling Socialists have long sought to exhume Franco's remains and turn the Valley of the Fallen complex near the capital Madrid into a memorial to the 500,000 people who were killed during the 1936-39 civil war he unleashed. The government had said it would go ahead with its plan by the end this week, and on Monday gave the day and time of the exhumation.



China seeks $2.4 billion in sanctions against U.S. in Obama-era case: WTO

China seeks $2.4 billion in sanctions against U.S. in Obama-era case: WTOChina is seeking $2.4 billion in retaliatory sanctions against the United States for non-compliance with a WTO ruling in a tariffs case dating to the Obama era, a document published on Monday showed. WTO appeals judges said in July that the United States did not fully comply with a WTO ruling and could face Chinese sanctions if it does not remove tariffs on solar panels, wind towers, steel cylinders and aluminium extrusions.



The Latest: Post-tornado search stalls, no deaths reported

The Latest: Post-tornado search stalls, no deaths reportedDallas Fire-Rescue says there have been no reports of fatalities or serious injuries in the aftermath of a Sunday night tornado, but three people were hospitalized for evaluation of non-life-threatening injuries. Spokesman Jason Evans says search teams conducted primary assessments on accessible structures for six hours overnight, but their efforts were "hampered by limited access and lack of proper lighting." A second set of teams will resume search efforts in daylight. Evans says the damage within Dallas is limited to an area bordered by Royal Lane to the north and Northwest Highway to the south, as well as Harry Hines Boulevard to the west and Interstate 75 to the east — essentially, northwest Dallas.



Area burned in 2019 forest fires in Indonesia exceeds 2018 - official

Area burned in 2019 forest fires in Indonesia exceeds 2018 - officialThe amount of land in Indonesia consumed by fires through September this year has exceeded the amount burned during all of 2018, according to data given by a government official on Monday. Raffles Panjaitan, forest fire management acting director at the Forestry and Environment Ministry, told reporters that by the end of September 2019 a total of 857,756 hectares (2.12 million acres) had been burned. The fires have consumed the most land since 2015, when government data showed 2.6 million hectares burned.



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The President is under immense pressure, and the signs show things may not improve
Donald Trump is under severe pressure after a disastrous run which saw his impeachment defense shredded by current and ex-officials and, most stunningly, by his own acting White House chief of staff.
Trump reverses course and says his Florida resort won't be used for G7 summit
President Donald Trump on Saturday night abruptly reversed course and announced next year's G7 economic summit of world powers would not be held at Trump National in Doral, Florida, in a rare departure after facing bipartisan back
Lindsey Graham does not rule out the possibility of Trump impeachment if new evidence emerges
In another sign of the dangerous predicament facing President Donald Trump, his longtime ally Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham said in an interview that aired Sunday night that he could not rule out the possibility of impeachment if
Justice Department distances itself from Giuliani
The DOJ says its official wouldn't have met with the President's attorney had it known some of his associates were being investigated
Cooper: Trump does this when he's blocked on something
CNN's Anderson Cooper breaks down President Donald Trump's response after the Supreme Court ruled a citizenship question could not be included on the 2020 census.
Former head of whistleblower program: Trump confused criminal trial with administrative procedure
Former Executive Director of the Intelligence Community's Whistleblowing Program Dan Meyer says that President Donald Trump is confusing an administrative procedure with a criminal trial.
Canada's election today will be a cliffhanger
Nasty. It is not a word associated much with Canada -- except perhaps with the winters here. But during this election campaign, nastiness has been one of the only unifying themes, as parties trade insults and dig up scandals from
Opinion: Trump's playing Russian roulette
By withdrawing US troops from Syria, President Donald Trump is playing a kind of Russian roulette, entrusting dangerous players with key US national security objectives.
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California Wildfire Victims Face Deadline To File Against PG&E
Monday is the deadline for victims of wildfires caused by California power company PG&E to file their claims. Only about half of those eligible for payments have already filed.
How 2 Kentucky Colleges Are Making Tuition-Free Work
A handful of colleges around the country charge zero dollars for tuition. To make the math work, they build their budgets around the concept that they won't collect revenue from students.
Off Script: Andrew Yang's Appeal To Undecided Voters
NPR's Noel King speaks to Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang and undecided voters, who pressed Yang on his candidacy and how he'll garner enough support for universal basic income.
Rudy Giuliani's Time As New York Mayor
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with journalist Bob Hennelly, who has spent years covering New York politics, about former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who is a central figure in the impeachment inquiry.
Impeachment Inquiry: Witness Testimonies Continue This Week
More witnesses are expected to speak with lawmakers this week as part of the impeachment inquiry. One of them is the current top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, William Taylor.
Mulvaney Walks Back Ukraine Remarks, Admits It Wasn't A 'Perfect Press Conference'
The acting White House chief of staff denied what he previously said: that defense funding to Ukraine was frozen in part over the demand that Kyiv dig up dirt on Trump's political rivals.
3 Soldiers Killed In Training Accident At Fort Stewart In Georgia
The tragic early morning training exercise also resulted in three other soldiers being hospitalized. The incident involved the Bradley Fighting Vehicle on which they were riding.
Lawyer Ben Crump On 'Open Season'
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Ben Crump, a lawyer for the families of many black Americans killed by police, about his new book
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Tornado ravages north Dallas, leaving thousands without power
A tornado plowed through parts of northern Dallas late on Sunday, knocking out power to more than 175,000 homes and businesses and delaying flights at regional airports, officials said.
PG&E plans more power cutoffs, warns of severe weather this week
PG&E Corp said it was considering more power cutoffs, which would be much smaller than the recent outage, as the bankrupt California power producer warned about severe weather risks later this week.
Three U.S. Army soldiers killed, three injured in training accident in Georgia
Three U.S. Army soldiers were killed and three injured on a base in the state of Georgia on Sunday when their armored car was involved in an accident during a training exercise, the Army said.
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Five things to know about Canada's general election
Will Canadians give Justin Trudeau a second chance when they head to the polls on Monday?
US troops leaving Syria will go to Iraq, says Pentagon chief
The withdrawal of US forces paved the way for a Turkish military offensive against Kurdish fighters.
Trump abandons plan to host G7 summit at his golf course
The plan to use one of the president's resorts in Florida sparked bipartisan criticism.
Katherine Ryan's boyfriend saves Netflix scripts during burglary
The comedian says her boyfriend "wrestled back" her laptop containing scripts for a Netflix series.
Black hole scientist Dr Katie Bouman on trolling and teamwork
Dr Katie Bouman's photo of the moment she saw her first black hole image went viral - but it wasn't all good.
The importance of bilingualism on the campaign trail
How does speaking French or Spanish affect a candidate's chances in North American politics?
Heavy play-off loss ends Rooney's MLS career
Wayne Rooney has been hailed as a "big plus" during his time at DC United, after the former England captain played his final MLS game.
Hong Kong protests: NBA fans join anti-China display
Spectators at a US basketball match don T-shirts and masks in support of the Hong Kong protests.
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WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange Due in Court to Fight Extradition to the U.S.
He is fighting extradition to the United States on charges of conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer
U.S. Takes Step to Require Asylum-Seekers’ DNA
The Justice Department will mandate DNA collection for almost all migrants who cross between official entry points and are held even temporarily
Hong Kong Leader and Police Chief Apologize to Muslim Community for Spraying Mosque With Water Cannon
The city's leader, Chief Executive Carrie Lam, and its police chief visited the Kowloon Mosque to say sorry
American Ambassador Defends New Rules for Chinese Diplomats
Chinese diplomats would be required to report contacts with American educators, researchers and local and state governments
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